• Archives,  book review

    Macunaíma, the hero of our people

    It’s said that Mario de Andrade wrote Macunaíma in six days in Araraquara (a city in the countryside near São Paulo), lying on a hammock, like the hero of his story would be in many scenes of the book. Although this novel is the fruit of years of studies of the Brazilian culture in every corner of the country, when I read that he wrote it in six days and thought that I’ve been trying to write my way simpler dystopian literary fiction for seven years and that I also have everything in my head, I just thought… yea, f you, Mario de Andrade. *laughs* I’m kidding. He was a…

  • Archives,  instagram

    For English to See

    I love you, forget sclaine Maine Itapiru / Forguet five underwood I Shell no bonde Silva Manuel / Manuel, Manuel, Manuel / I love you too heavy Steven via Catumbay / Independence lá do Paraguai, Studbaker Jaceguai Lamartine Babo, “Canção Para Inglês Ver” You don’t have to understand that song. I don’t know everything in those lyrics either. But I know what Lamartine Babo was criticizing. Actually, many people might think that I do exactly what he’s protesting against in that song. The use of English instead of Portuguese, our mother tongue. Trying to do what the gringos do. Do things “for English to see,” which can mean a lot…

  • Archives,  book review

    Reading can be experienced in over a thousand ways, here’s one of them

    Reading can be experienced in over a thousand different ways. One of the most common types of reading makes you follow the quest or journey of a great hero, and you embark on adventures with them. Usually, you have a protagonist, someone who wants something, but there’s an obstacle for them to have it. So they face a conflict, they struggle, they resolve it, and, finally, they get what they want. But that is not what happens in O Cortiço (“The Slum”) by Aloísio de Azevedo. This novel written in Brazil, in 1890, is not about a protagonist with a name, it’s about protagonists. Archetypes. A society. A country. It’s…