• Archives,  instagram,  writing

    writing tools

    Hey, the sun is back. It has nothing to do with today’s topic but I just wanted to say that first. I’m happy. It’s been a gray week, and it’s good to finally see the sun doing its thing outside my window. Alright, back to the Beard… remember that reel I made about writing tools? I’m convinced that the tools we use have a direct impact on our writing flow and creativity. I know it affects me, at least. Like the trigger effect or the environment we discussed on that post about writing at coffee shops, you know? I know I need three things to work: vibe, focus, and a…

  • Archives,  instagram,  writing

    would you use this method for writing?

    WRITING HERE EVERY day led me, at some point, to look for productivity methods and apps that would optimize my work, time, and decision-making process. I found editorial calendars and lists to be my favorite ways to organize my content (and my life, actually). So, at the end of the month, I sit in front of an app called @craftsdoc, and I make a list of days I post here and the topics I wanna write about. For example, this post looks like this in my content plan: “Mo 31 — editorial calendar for writing books?”. I mean… urgh, I just gave away an important part of this post but…

  • Archives,  instagram,  writing

    There are seven steps to write.

    Hey there. According to Roy Peter Clark, there are seven steps to write. If you take writing as a process, a set of steps, here’s what he suggests: ➊ GET STARTED. Think about what to write, work on ideas, research. ➋ GET YOUR ACT TOGETHER. Create habits, get organized, find what you need and when you need it, and keep it all simple. ➌ FIND FOCUS. Define the story, think of writing as a problem-solving process, and keep the right mindset. ➍ LOOK FOR LANGUAGE. Sharpen your language skills, read more, and try to find out how to use language for a particular effect or use words with intention. At…

  • Archives,  blogging,  content creation,  writing

    The ultimate secret to writing amazing blog posts

    I’m gonna tell you a secret. The reason why you clicked or tapped the headline of this post and the reason why you’re reading this right now if you’re not a regular reader is as disturbing as the rest of what I’m about to say. Humans respond to words as a dog responds to a command. The only difference is that a dog just sits, stands up, rolls, and barks. Words, for us humans, can make us cry, laugh, feel, and even buy. There’s something beautiful about this, and that’s one of the reasons why I love writing. I must admit. But when I say buy, I can mean paying…

  • Archives,  writing

    What do to while walking when you’re a writer

    Hey Reader, This morning on Instagram, I posted a few things you can do in a 30-minute walk. I think it’s a perfect exercise. At least I prefer that to running. As a writer, there are some pretty interesting benefits in what you can do while walking, too. Here’s a list of what we could do: 1. Observe the surroundings You only get the actual idea of paths, walking distance, buildings, and all, if you take a walk. My current work in progress is set around my neighborhood, and I got interesting insights while walking around. Umberto Eco said once that he would go to a place and study everything…

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    How to turn what you read into something you can use

    If you read books on writing, you’ll get influenced by what their authors believe to be a good way to write or the way you should plan or organize your writing process. If you read inspiring books, compelling works, books you love, and books that touch your heart or your mind with their inky hands, you’ll get influenced by their authors’ styles and ideas for sure. If you do a long research about a topic you wanna write about, you’ll get influenced by the most convincing material you find, the ones you choose to read, and you might get a little biased. There’s no way to avoid those things completely,…

  • Archives,  writing

    How to find the courage to write

    We can’t eradicate our writing fears. Nor would we want to. They’re what makes writing so challenging and satisfying. Ralph Keyes, in The Courage to Write Fear is everywhere. It’s our worst enemy because we are the ones behind it. We feel it. We create it. We make it an obstacle to our achievements. That fear comes from many sources, like the feeling you’re an impostor, that our writing is not good, or too cliché, nothing original, that grammar mistakes and words we choose will be criticized, and this is gonna ruin our writing careers. It can also come from the anticipation of other fears like readers not liking what…

  • Archives,  writing

    How to write an outline like setting goals

    I was thinking about productivity and goals. You know I’m a planner, and I like setting goals for almost everything. I also advocate a lot for outlining as an important writing tool, especially if you see them as a writing itinerary, a map, or a checklist for a story or an idea’s exposition. I don’t want to bring the whole discussion about outlining or not, pantsers vs. plotters, and all that. Let’s just assume you have nothing against outlining and that you also see it as the writing tool that it is. There are a million different approaches for it. You can list plot points, significant events, you can use…

  • Archives,  writing

    How to find your writing voice

    You know that, when we write, we don’t just spit words for nothing hoping they will make sense to our readers. It doesn’t work like that, not even for poetry. To write is to create an illusion. That’s why many writers say that writing is magic. What we do here is to create an experience where our readers believe that a person is speaking to them through our words, through our voices. It’s a beautiful illusion that amazes the other side of the paper or the screen when it’s well written. And we all have many voices in life, haven’t we? The private-life voice, the work voice, the serious voice…

  • Archives,  writing

    What is a character?

    Orson Scott Card wrote in Characters & Viewpoint that characters are people. Human beings. Whole and alive, believable, and worth caring about. Like I said last week, storytelling is not just about narrating a string of events without a purpose. It’s about what happens, to whom, the struggle to achieve a goal, and a final change at the end. Characters are our “to whom”. And even if your protagonist is not initially a person nor alive (they can be a city, an animal, a ghost), you make them look human in your writing. You want to make them living, whole, believable, and worth caring about. The character is the soul…